Trust Me Trust Me Trust Me Trust

When you throw a hand-
Ful of lawn darts into the air

Because a voice in your head
Tells you to—shout Heads-up!,

Watch everyone at the BBQ
Geegaw skyward, & then after

Cleaning up the mess, start collecting
Bottled water, SPAM. From then on,

Nothing in your life will ever be
Dire, but, sorry to break it to you,

The end is coming soon. So, drive
With no hands, charge into oncoming

Traffic. Eat those eggs that were best
By sometime last year. You are

One of the chosen—don’t think
Too much about what’s happening

Around you. Listen to me, now—
Let me in. There’s a tremendous

Amount of untapped energy
In staring straight ahead. Hold on

To that. Be positive. A very famous
Person once said that anyone can

Quit smoking but it takes
A real man to face cancer. Buy

Truck nuts & attach them
To your belt. The last days

Will be vivid—practice
For the end by wrapping, again

& again, the cat in Saran Wrap.
Booby-trap the yard with spike-

Sharpened wooden spoons. Sit
Like a pretty little lotus, reading

Survival manuals. It doesn’t
Matter if it’s in the basement

Or you’re spear-fishing at the
Bottom of the pool—you’ll no

Longer hear the naysayers
& their ugly living. Don’t waste

One tear on all those meatsacks
You called friends. You’re only

About the good shit now—
Bring on that everloving jelly.

This poem first appeared in American Poetry Review.

Front page image by SLR Jester.

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Alex Lemon

About the Author

Alex Lemon is the author of Happy: A Memoir, and the poetry collections Mosquito, Hallelujah Blackout and Fancy Beasts. A book of essays and a new poetry collection are forthcoming from Milkweed Editions. His writing has appeared in Esquire, The Huffington Post, Best American Poetry 2008, Satellite Convulsions, Tin House, Kenyon Review, AGNI, The Southern Review and jubilat, among others. Among his awards are a 2005 Literature Fellowship in Poetry from the National Endowment for the Arts and a 2006 Minnesota Arts Board Grant. He is a frequent book reviewer for the Dallas Morning News. He lives in Ft. Worth, Texas, and teaches at TCU. He is www.alexlemon.com and tweets as @Alxlemon.
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